While Solid State Drives (SSD) provide a significant improvement over traditional Hard Disk Drives (HDD), there will always be a risk associated with physical data backup. SSD’s operate at faster speeds, wear down slower, and are smaller/lighter/more sleek than a HDD. This being said, their increased durability and design opens up SSD’s to a plethora of issues associated with data loss.

Like any physical drive, there is an inherent failure rate which increases with age. This is unavoidable and will ultimately result in data loss (at some point). Although this failure rate is higher with standard HDD’s due to their moving parts, data recovery is more likely to be successful than on a SSD. By design there are very few pieces to recover data from a damaged or failed SSD, and this recovery attempt is further hampered if you encrypt your data prior to saving it on the drive. Essentially, once a SSD fails, unfortunately you are very unlikely to get any data back.

Even with a traditional HDD, data recovery is never 100%. Companies cannot guarantee getting all, or even some of your data back. With an average failure rate ranging between 2% and 13% based on manufacturer and age, this can put your business into a difficult position.

The Solution

The simple solution to prevent failing drives, data loss, and the stress that this all brings to your business is Canadian Cloud Backup. By using our cloud backup service, you can guarantee you never lose important data. By automating the backup process and knowing your data is safely stored in the cloud, you can have peace of mind that any disaster (be it manmade or natural) won’t hinder your success. Safely backup your data, and have peace of mind moving forward with Canadian Cloud Backup.

2 Comments

  1. Dee-
    July 23, 2014 at 2:45 pm

    I love SSD Drives! I just purchased my second SSD for my laptop. First one lasted over 4.5 years or intense usage!

  2. July 23, 2014 at 3:23 pm

    Wow, I never knew about this. Thanks for sharing!

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